AS THEFLIES


Now Hiring! Brooklyn Sales Rep

irving farm now hiring
Irving Farm Coffee Roasters is now hiring for the position of Sales Representative, based out of our Education and Training Loft in Lower Manhattan, New York City. We're looking for a knowledgeable, enthusiastic, and like-minded Farmer to join our Sales Team and cover our Brooklyn territory.

Read below to see if this person might be you or someone you know, and direct all inquiries and applications to jobs@irvingfarm.com.

 

JOB DESCRIPTION

Responsibilities include:

-Maintain positive relationships between IFCR and existing wholesale partners

-Identify and engage new wholesale partners Troubleshoot and diagnose partner issues, and facilitate solutions, including coffee preparation and equipment knowledge

-Be a positive and knowledgeable representative of IFCR in the craft food and beverage community

Qualifications:

-Team Player. We are a small business and operate like one, just about everyone still answers the phone and does the dishes some days, it's important that you work well with others and are interested in prioritizing the team's success.

-Self Starter. Come with Ideas, Enthusiasm for Great Coffee and Customer Service, and organizational skills.

-Previous coffee experience.

-Professional work experience preferred.

Salary and Position Details:

-As much delicious coffee as you can drink

-Salary dependent on experience

-Commissions after initial 90 day training period

-Access to company Health plan after first 90 days with employer contribution

-Access to company 401k plan with employer matching after 1 year

-Professional Development and educational opportunities throughout the year

-This is a full time position.

Irving Farm is an Equal Opportunity Employer. We strongly encourage applicants of all races, ethnicities, genders, and sexual orientations to apply; we are committed to a diverse workplace and world.

COMPENSATION

This position is PAID: salaried, dependent on experience.

    Ask Your Barista: What Are You Drinking This Summer?

    irvingfarm,barista,coffee,summer,drinks,nyc

    ♥ Find their picks here ♥


    Made With Love: Talking Coffee, Clothes and Community with Jill Lindsey

    Words and Photos by Sophia Pizzo
    jill lindsey, coffee, irving farm, fort greene, boutique, community

     

    In Jill Lindsey’s eponymous store, her personal touch is immediately evident. From her own clothes adorning the racks, to the furniture she designed herself, everything is made with love and an attention to detail. The store sells apparel, gifts and jewelry, features a café and “secret garden” in the back, and includes a lower floor dedicated to wellness treatments.

    A fashion designer by trade, Jill opened her Fort Greene store in 2014 as a way to sell her clothes, as well as to enrich the community.

    “I’ve lived in this neighborhood for many years, and there weren’t a lot of options for stores or coffee," says Jill. “I thought it would be the best option to open my own store so I could sell whatever I wanted, make whatever I wanted, and I could promote my friends and other independent designers.”

     

    jill lindsey, coffee, irving farm, fort greene, boutique, community

     

    Jill aspires to find a happy medium between high fashion and what her customers want. “My inspiration comes from a lot of places,” says Jill. “There’s the very haute couture, luxury gowns and embellished dresses, which is always my first love. Then it came down to, ‘What do people need?’ We need quality clothes at affordable prices, we need them made with love, and we need them to be universal…I’m basically inspired by the people.”

     

    jill lindsey, coffee, irving farm, fort greene, boutique, community

     

    Jill has a passion for working with people and growing with the community. “A majority of the products in the store are from the neighborhood, which is amazing. Local designers and artisans will come here and we’ll meet with them and try to support them growing with us, as we continue to grow ourselves.”

    Jill Lindsey also sells sandals made by artisans in Nicaragua, with whom she collaborates. “The sandals have been one of our top-selling products,” says Jill. “It’s amazing because we started out with just a few people making them, and now we just keep giving them business and growing with them, which is really special.”

     

    jill lindsey, coffee, irving farm, fort greene, boutique, community

     

    Collaboration and growth extends to every aspect of Jill’s store, including the café where she proudly serves Irving Farm’s Blackstrap Espresso. “It’s delicious! We’ve been serving it since we opened. We love Irving Farm,” raves Jill. “It is one of the most incredible companies that I have ever done business with, and I feel very fortunate. I really wanted to have a coffee that was stand-out and awesome, sustainable, and all that goodness."

     

    jill lindsey, coffee, irving farm, fort greene, boutique, community

     

    The store also boasts a calendar chock full of events, which range from kid’s sing-alongs to crafting workshops and beauty bars. “I don’t know if there’s one that’s my favorite, because every single one is so special,” says Jill. The event calendar, like many of Jill’s endeavors, grew out of a passion for the Fort Greene community. “I wanted to be able to give this street some love…it’s just nice to give this community something to do, something that’s going to enrich their lives and give them an experience. And for the people that I’m working on the events with, it gives them the opportunity to make a dream come true, or do something they’ve always wanted to do.”

     

    jill lindsey, coffee, irving farm, fort greene, boutique, community

     

    Jill Lindsey has continued to grow with the community, and will be growing even further to include a new location in Malibu, California at the end of June. “I think it’s been a true testament to following your dreams and doing something with passion and love, so we’re just gonna keep doing it!”

     

    jill lindsey, coffee, irving farm, fort greene, boutique, community

     

    Jill Lindsey

    370 Myrtle Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11205

    www.jilllindsey.com/

     

    Beat The Heat: Make An Iced Pour-Over

    Home Iced Pour-Over Coffee

    It’s summer in the city, which means there's a throng of tourists in a hot, smelly garbage cloud following you everywhere, your "cozy" fifth-floor walkup doesn’t feel like such a great deal anymore, and the office A/C just broke on the hottest day of the year. The last thing you need to worry about is getting extra-sweaty carrying your thermos of hot coffee around! If our team at Irving Farm HQ can do anything to help improve your summer (while you’re not at one of our cafés), it’s offering you our failproof iced pour-over coffee method.

    While many cafés offer batch cold-brewed coffee, we find that the nuance and acidity that’s naturally within each coffee bean shines brighter in an iced pour-over. We do our large-batch and hand-brew methods over ice because they result in the most flavorful cup of coffee, but it’s also the most convenient method for the at-home barista! If you didn’t prepare a cold brew batch the required 12 hours ahead of time and you need your caffeine kick now, here’s how to make an iced pour-over coffee using a standard pour-over cone and decanter. 

    CAFÉ PROCESS

    (scroll down for the at-home version)

    1. Place 200g ice in the decanter.

    2. Add 30g coffee (ground slightly finer than for a hot pour-over) in the filter.

    3. Pour 60-70g hot water onto the coffee and allow to bloom for 1 min. Then slowly pour the rest of the water—about 130-140g. Total amount of water should be 200g.

    4. Total brew time should be about 3 min 30 sec.

    5. Swirl and pour over a glass of ice.

     

    AT-HOME DIRECTIONS

    If you don't intend to use a scale to calibrate your daily coffee in grams, these directions aren't as painstakingly exact—but they're close enough!:

    1. Place 8 or 9 ice cubes in the decanter (hot tip: a pint-sized mason jar, Pyrex pitcher, or regular ceramic mug will also work—as long at it's a vessel that's meant to withstand boiling water).

    2. Add about 1/3 US cup coffee (ground slightly finer than for a hot pour-over) in the filter.

    3. Pour about 60-70ml (about 1/3 US cup) hot water onto the coffee and allow to bloom for 1 min. Then slowly pour the rest of the water—about 130-140ml. Total amount of water should be 200ml—a little less than 1 US cup.

    4. Total brew time should be about 3 min 30 sec.

    5. Swirl and pour over a glass of ice...and enjoy!

    Barista Magazine Interviews Irving Farm Women on Gender Etiquette in the Workplace

    This is the first post of Stop Interrupting My Grinding, a series dedicated to the ongoing conversation about diversity in the coffee industry, here on the Irving Farm blog.

     

    barista magazine, the future is female, barista magazine the future is female, women in coffee, irving farm, irving farm women

    “The Future Is Female” is the powerful theme of the June/July issue of Barista Magazine, and we’re proud to report that our very own Teresa von Fuchs and Liz Dean were asked to contribute their insights on gender etiquette in the workplace. Here at Irving Farm, we’re lucky to have a lot of talented, passionate women in leadership positions, but the coffee industry as a whole still has plenty of room for improvement—especially when it comes to equality of opportunity.

    As author Nora Burkey admits at the beginning of the article, this is a contentious topic—but she makes sure to note that equality is not about erasing difference. It’s about embracing different people’s strengths and needs, modifying antiquated systems, and perhaps most importantly, listening to your employees. As Teresa, our Director of Wholesale, says, “When someone is telling you their experience, you don’t need to argue.”

     

     

    Through conversations with women from around the world, Burkey surveys how success in the coffee industry is often more elusive for those who don’t fall under the umbrella of heteronormative, masculine-performing, cisgender men. The women interviewed in the article share their experiences, asking us to consider all of the small forms of disrespect that add up to a talented, passionate, and competent worker dealing with real feelings of alienation. It’s someone on the phone calling you “honey” in a condescending tone and then asking for the person in charge, or it’s only ever seeing pictures of brawny men on barista competition fliers, or it’s your boss telling you you’re too cocky if you exhibit the same ambition and confidence as male co-workers. It’s death by a thousand cuts.

    The article eschews a sense of finger-pointing by offering thoughts on what can to be done to improve the situation. Liz, Irving Farm’s Director of Retail, muses, “You need to build in support for issues like this. I think everyone, regardless of whether they’re working in retail coffee as a career or a part-time position while they finish school, is deserving of a safe, comfortable, welcome workplace where they are heard. I do think that sometimes how those issues are handled can be a deterrent for people in further pursuing a career within the service and hospitality industry.”

    Teresa also talks about how coffee, despite its reputation for being a more progressive-minded field, is not immune to discrimination. “As women I think we need to be encouraging people to see things from more sides. These things are complicated. Everyone has a different threshold of comfort, and sometimes it’s OK to call me ‘honey,’ and sometimes it’s not. It’s confusing for us, too. I’m not suggesting we police speech, but it’s not enough to recognize that in our industry small companies can tend to be liberal. The smallness allows fluidity, but usually they are not big enough to have clearly defined corporate discrimination policies.”

     irving farm, teresa von fuchs, diversity in coffee, barista magazine, mayita mendez

     

    It’s a conversation that’s only in its beginning stages, and we at Irving Farm applaud Barista Magazine for dedicating their recent issue to talking about gender in the coffee industry. Read the entire June magazine hereand also check out work by two other Irving Farm women in this issue: photography by Wholesale Representative Mayita Mendez, and illustrations by freelance illustrator/former Irving Farm barista Alabaster Pizzo.

     

    Gracie's Photo Diary: Las Capucas, Copan, Honduras

    Gracie Pizzo has been with Irving Farm since her barista days in 2008, and is now the company's Creative Director.

    In February, I was invited to visit the Las Capucas Co-op in Copan, Honduras — one of Irving Farm’s longest-standing relationships — to learn more about how we directly source coffee. It was my first trip to coffee's origin, and it was amazing to see the very coffee we just received at our Roastery in its earliest stages of life. I had the opportunity to meet the producers and visit the homes and farms of our Los Lirios and Platanares coffees. Our super-popular Capucas coffee is a blend of coffees from multiple farmers at the co-op. Buying from Capucas supports the organization's own school and clinic, and their commitment to organic farming and sustainable community initiatives.

     

    I’ll never forget this experience! Here are a few photos from the trip:

    las capucas copan honduras irving farm coffee roasters new york origin beans sustainability direct trade

    las capucas copan honduras irving farm coffee roasters new york origin beans sustainability direct trade

    las capucas copan honduras irving farm coffee roasters new york origin beans sustainability direct trade

    las capucas copan honduras irving farm coffee roasters new york origin beans sustainability direct trade

    las capucas copan honduras irving farm coffee roasters new york origin beans sustainability direct trade
    las capucas copan honduras irving farm coffee roasters new york origin beans sustainability direct trade

    las capucas copan honduras irving farm coffee roasters new york origin beans sustainability direct trade
    Coffee from field to the cupping room in Copan, Honduras

    las capucas copan honduras irving farm coffee roasters new york origin beans sustainability direct trade

    las capucas copan honduras irving farm coffee roasters new york origin beans sustainability direct trade

    las capucas copan honduras irving farm coffee roasters new york origin beans sustainability direct trade
    José Francisco, aka "Pancho". Coffee Producer: Platanares

     

    las capucas copan honduras irving farm coffee roasters new york origin beans sustainability direct trade
    Pancho's daughter, Lourdes Villeda, and her daughter.
    Lourdes is a barista at Café Capucas, where they serve their own coffee.
     las capucas copan honduras irving farm coffee roasters new york origin beans sustainability direct trade
    Inside Jose Luis Rivera's solar dryer.  Coffee Producer: Los Lirios
    Jose Luis's daughter is pictured in front.
    las capucas copan honduras irving farm coffee roasters new york origin beans sustainability direct trade
    Jose Luis's house

    las capucas copan honduras irving farm coffee roasters new york origin beans sustainability direct trade

    las capucas copan honduras irving farm coffee roasters new york origin beans sustainability direct trade

    las capucas copan honduras irving farm coffee roasters new york origin beans sustainability direct trade

    las capucas copan honduras irving farm coffee roasters new york origin beans sustainability direct trade
    Exploring the Co-op

    las capucas copan honduras irving farm coffee roasters new york origin beans sustainability direct trade

    las capucas copan honduras irving farm coffee roasters new york origin beans sustainability direct trade
    Driving through Santa Rosa, Honduras to visit the Beneficio (mill) from which the coffee is shipped 

    las capucas copan honduras irving farm coffee roasters new york origin beans sustainability direct trade
    Cupping at the Beneficio Santa Rosa, Honduras

     las capucas copan honduras irving farm coffee roasters new york origin beans sustainability direct trade

    las capucas copan honduras irving farm coffee roasters new york origin beans sustainability direct trade

    Coffee waiting to be milled and shipped. Pictured: Dan Streetman, our green coffee buyer, with Omar Rodriguez, manager of Las Capucas

    - -

    photos by Gracie Pizzo (pictured second from left)

    las capucas copan honduras irving farm coffee roasters new york origin beans sustainability direct trade

     2016

     

     



    Now Open on the Upper East Side!

    irving farm coffee roasters upper east side new york city

    We've got big news, and you're all invited! Irving Farm's newest (and largest, and dare we say most beauteous?) café is now open on the Upper East Side at 1424 Third Avenue at 81st Street. This 1,700-square-foot space boasts Irving Farm's largest seating area and also its largest kitchen, where we focus on creating fresh, delicious modern comfort offerings to complement our seasonal coffees and favorite year-round blends. We're proud to showcase espresso, filter brew coffee, and by-the-cup Kalita pour-over brews of our Hudson-Valley-roasted coffee at the spacious front bar. From the white oak floors to the Brendan Ravenhill lamps above, we've dressed this coffee shop to the nines from bottom to top. We couldn't be happier to be a part of this busy and taste-savvy community.

    irving farm coffee roasters upper east side new york city manhattan

    Join us for the official opening celebration on Friday, May 27 at 7am for free hot and iced coffee all day, and take in the new surroundings with all your favorite coffees, baked goods, and fresh, housemade foods.

     

    It's Earth Day!

    We're green with glee over Earth Day today, a day to celebrate our planet and take pride in the work we do this day and every day at Irving Farm to contribute to a more sustainable planet. From working directly with farms to encourage agriculture that's both conscientiously grown and delicious to drink to reducing our own roasting emissions and working to offset deforestation locally and globally, we've got our eye on the earth and our feet on the green grassy ground.


    Globally, we seek out coffees that are not only farmed with quality in mind but sustainability. 85% of the coffee we buy is grown under shade, which contributes to carbon sequestration and prevents deforestation for coffee cultivation. We buy coffee from cooperatives like the Capucas co-op in Honduras which supports not only clinics and schools, but community initiatives like composting and harvesting honey to stimulate the bee population.

    loring roaster irving farm coffee millerton hudson valley sustainability

    Locally, we focus on lessening our negative impact on the earth every day, from compostable iced coffee cups and biodegradeable to-go utensils in all our stores to operating a brand new, high-efficiency Loring coffee roaster that uses 90% less gas than other roasters and planting native grasses on the lands at our new roasting space. The ingredients we serve in our cafes are locally sourced whenever possible, with all our milk coming from pasture-raised, New York State cows. Last year, we introduced New-York-made Pumpkin Seed Milk as an alternative to almond milk, which had a much higher environmental cost. We compost all our organic matter, and, of course, encourage our customers to bring their own reusable mugs by offering a discount whenever they do.

    rainforest foundation coffee irving farm earth sustainability

    And if you'd like to make it even more local, like in your own kitchen? Order a bag of our Rainforest Foundation Project coffee, a fully organic blend whose proceeds benefit the Rainforest Foundation, founded in 1989 by Sting and Trudie Styler. We donate $1 per each bag sold directly to the Foundation. We've donated $4,900 to the foundation since last Earth Day, enough to protect 1010 acres of rainforest, or the size Central Park. To date, we've donated more than $16,000 to the Rainforest Foundation, protecting more than three Central Parks worth of trees. 

    As lovers of coffee, we can't but love the earth that gives it to us. Celebrate with us today with your conscious choices—and of course, a delicious cup of sustainably grown coffee.