AS THEFLIES


Blue Hill, Dan Barber and Coffee Get WastED

wastED photography by Daniel Krieger

Photograph by Daniel Krieger

Last month, Irving Farm Coffee Roasters was delighted to participate in Blue Hill's transformation into wastED, a one of a kind pop-up restaurant that invited diners to reconsider food waste while some of the country's top chefs daringly innovated their way through 600 pounds of ugly vegetables (including 350 pounds vegetable pulp), 150 pounds of kale ribs, 30 gallons of beef tallow, 475 pounds of skate cartilage and 900 pounds of waste-fed pigs, creating 10,000 unique dishes over the course of three weeks. Irving Farm's contribution was cascara, also known as the skin or husk of the coffee cherry. When coffee is de-pulped, the discarded cascara is traditionally composted and repurposed as fertilizer (or ends up as a pollutant in the surrounding waterways) but it also contains a delicious mucilage with a sweet, earthy flavor and up to 25% of the caffeine found in a normal cup of coffee. The Ortiz Herrera family at Finca Talnamica in El Salvador generously hand-picked and sun-dried 150 pounds of cascara from their Bourbon plants for this event, and producers Hermann and Nena Mendez were able to dine at wastED with their daughter, Mayita, who has worked for Irving Farm since 2013. Their Talnamica coffee was recently featured in our limited edition Horchata Chocolate Bar from Raaka Chocolate, and it was thrilling to see the husks turned into a delicious infusion that challenged us to rethink the idea of after-dinner coffee. All of this was made possible by the incomparable Dan Barber, chef and co-owner of Blue Hill in Manhattan and Blue Hill at Stone Barns in Pocantico Hills, NY. We count ourselves very lucky to partner with chefs who are deeply committed to understanding and honoring the scope of how food is grown, prepared and consumed—physically, intellectually and emotionally. Dan is at the forefront of this conversation and our Director of Wholesale, Teresa von Fuchs, was able to chat with him about a few of his takeaways at the conclusion of wastED. 

wastED-kitchen_Dan-Barbe-Daniel-Krieger-Photographer

Photograph by Daniel Krieger

TvF: What was your aim behind the wastED pop up? DB: One goal was can we create something that disrupts our daily routine, wakes us up and really focuses our efforts? I really believe that in cooking (as well as in life, but I don’t give advice about life) you only become better by working outside your comfort zone. And wastED was hard. It stretched us as a restaurant and built camaraderie in really surprising ways. Another aim was to really wear our heart on our sleeves more everyday. Whether we were pushing this agenda because of environmental reasons or economic reasons, could we really highlight our use of craft and not hide the fact that restaurants work to use as much of every ingredient as possible everyday?

wastED-beef-tallow-candle-Noah-Fecks-Photographer

Beef tallow candle at wastED. Photograph by Noah Fecks.

TvF: You mentioned camaraderie. Was one impetus of including guest chefs to help spread the mission? DB: Not at all. Our intent wasn’t to inspire other kitchens but to recognize that this is what Chefs are already doing everyday in their kitchens. Actually we were all a little surprised by the interest! The crazy long lines late at night and all the social media attention. Also that we attracted such younger crowds. It feels like we’ve given the restaurant a new life. TvF: Irving Farm helped source a special cascara (or coffee cherry) preparation for the coffee course. What was your first reaction when you tried it? DB: I really fell in love with it. The fullness of the sweetness was just so surprising. It was really a revelation. I remember standing in the kitchen with Adam Kaye, our Chef and Kitchen director at Stone Barns, and being totally amazed by the flavor. It was one of my top three experiences in this whole process. I can’t wait to keep using it. I want to cook with it. TvF: That’s fantastic! We’re so happy we could share it with you. Now that the pop-up is over, how has it changed—or will it change—the menu at Blue Hill? DB: We’re still figuring that out. I’d really like to keep pushing how we can wear our heart on our sleeve. Most of our menu already addresses waste, so how can we keep calling attention to it without losing diners’ enthusiasm. I hope we keep working on it together.

Huge thanks to Chef Dan, Finca Talnamica and everyone who took the plunge with us at wastED. Stay tuned for more cascara collaborations popping up around the city in the coming months!

True Magic at Krupa Grocery

Irving Farm has a longstanding appreciation for great food—particularly breakfast-oriented foods. Our relationship with Brooklyn's Krupa Grocery, a restaurant that excels at breakfast-oriented foods as well as all foods from all the other times of day, has been going strong since their opening in April, 2014. 

Alchemy isn’t just about turning matter into gold. At least for Bob Lenartz, co-owner of Krupa Grocery in Windsor Terrace, it’s when things come together to create something greater than the sum of its parts. It’s magical. Bob had opened Slope Cellars and Windsor Wines, focusing on artisanal wines and spirits, and dreamed of building the kind of neighborhood place where folks could come to celebrate both the everyday and a special occasion. When the old Krupa Grocery on Prospect Park West became available, he saw an opportunity to make his bistro dream a reality. Krupa was a corner store and deli for over 20 years, owned and operated by the Patel family, that also happened to feature a backyard (a form of real estate alchemy in NYC). Locals called it “Love’s” because that was the salutation of endearment that greeted everyone who walked through the door. 

Barista Rex bringing the Irving Farm Coffee to the people at Krupa Grocery.[/caption] Around this time Bob made the acquaintance of Tom Sperduto, another Windsor Terrace resident with dreams of opening a neighborhood oasis. Once an elementary school art teacher who worked summers and weekends at Eleven Madison Park, he eventually moved into food full-time, developing his relationship to “enlightened hospitality” at Clinton Street Baking Company, Community Food & Juice, and Craftbar. The third piece of the puzzle was Tom’s colleague at Craftbar, Chef Domenick Gianfrancesco, who was ready for a kitchen of his own. Together, they spent over a year building out the former grocery space, salvaging original details such as the tin ceiling which they repurposed as a bar front. It was important for them to build upon the goodwill of the Patel family business (thus keeping the name) and allow the restaurant to reflect their love of food as well as community. 

One of Tom’s chief areas of interest happened to be coffee, as he had spent years developing the coffee programs at his other restaurants. He knew that great coffee was a necessary tool for integrating a new restaurant into neighborhood ritual, whether it’s starting the day with breakfast or the finish to a memorable meal, so he put great care into selecting special coffees and overseeing drink preparation. Now, after all the hard work and alignment of stars, you can go to Krupa for an expertly prepared cappuccino, breakfast gnocchi with bacon and beet greens, or a hanger steak garnished with bone marrow, and it all tastes like it was prepared just for you, like the food is saying, “Hey Love.” On a recent visit, Bob was standing near the bar explaining the history behind the hanging cymbal light fixtures, how each one came together piece by piece, slowly making something much more special than he originally thought he was building. Staring up at the cymbals, he realized that’s it. That’s alchemy. That’s Krupa. 

Krupa Grocery is located at 231 Prospect Park West, Brooklyn, NY 11215. They open for coffee at 7am seven days a week.

Hot Off the Presses at Daily Press Coffee

Hot off the Press

On a beautiful day in August, we sat down with Michael Zawacki, owner of Daily Press Coffee in Bed-Stuy, and its sister shop in Williamsburg, to talk about coffee, neighborhoods and how as a small business owner you’re always looking for ways to improve.

So how did you first get interested in coffee? Like most people, in a very roundabout way. I moved to Bed-Stuy in 2006. I’ve always had an interest in history and urban planning and I just loved the fabric of the neighborhood, the architecture, the history, etc. Though as a Brooklyn neighborhood, it really lacked services. I have a construction background, and at the time I was building high end retail stores and I kept thinking I’d love to build some useful retail in my neighborhood—maybe a general store or something. Then, like a lot of people, I got laid off in 2008. I was sitting in a coffee shop, one of the very few in the neighborhood at this point, and I was thinking I really wanted to open a coffee shop that celebrates the history of this neighborhood.

Irving FarmSo how was the process from idea to build-out? Well I got another job doing construction stuff, and started working on my business plan. I’d tried to write a business plan before for an idea I’d had about helping people live more energy efficiently and I just never could finish it, but this time it went much faster. I started writing the plan in May 2009 and determined to be open by April 2011. I also realized I didn’t really know anything about coffee. I went to all the shops in the city trying to get a job on the weekends, just to learn and realized there was real professional culture of baristas. The only place that would hire me was a natural grocery store. They had a cafe set up inside and though they bought beans from well respected roasters, no one there took it very seriously. I found a coffee handbook from Gimme! there and really dug into it. I remember telling the owners, hey I back flushed the machine today and they weren’t nearly as excited as I was. I also reached out to everyone in coffee I heard about and was really surprised how generous all the shop owners and community at large were with information. I also learned that there isn’t really a secret to all of this, success lies in how you execute, in all the details lining up, every day.

Tell us about finding the space and pulling the pieces together for the first Daily Press Coffee? While I was learning about coffee, I also finished my business plan and met a business partner. That really helped get things moving. We saw the space on Franklin in November or December of 2010 and opened April 28, 2011.  I learned a lot of lessons along the way.

Irving Farm Coffee RoastersI’ve heard some stories about the demo and build-out, you did most of the work yourself? No, I was working on a construction job at the time, project managing for an energy efficiency company in the South Bronx, but I’d come in after work and keep up the work till 10 or 11 at night and help keep things moving on weekends. The space was a beauty supply shop, but when we started ripping it out we found a second false ceiling above the first and it was actually connected to the walls. It was like a big steel box, not sure I want to know what it was for. We had to burn out that ceiling with torches. We found a lot of other strange stuff under the floor, and in the walls. My favorite was a subway ticket inside the wall. And I still find interesting relics when I’m doing anything in the backyard.

I love the framed subway ticket! Is that part of how you use the space to pay homage to the history of the neighborhood? Yes! When I was still in the researching phase I spent a lot of time at the NY Public Library searching historical facts about the neighborhood, businesses in the area, etc. I learned that the Teddy Bear was invented in Bed-Stuy by a party store on Tompkins. And I was also very specific about the cafe being in Bed-Stuy, not Clinton Hill. We stock a book in the shop from the Images of America History series just on Bedford-Stuyvesant.It’s one of my inspirations.

What did you want to do differently when  you decided it was time to open the second shop? Build adequate bar space! It was nice to start from scratch and really think a space through in terms of improving the customer experience, the staff’s work flow. I mean there could always be more space behind the bar or for storage, but it was nice to take what we learned from Bed-Stuy and apply it to a totally new space. Really start from the dust and the beams. The build out took a little longer than planned and we did a lot more detailed finishing touches, so we didn’t open until November 2013.

Daily Press

How did you first learn about Irving Farm? From the beginning I wanted to work with as many local companies as possible. After the first year we started doing our guest roaster program, it was great to meet new companies and be able to still engage in changes and developments happening in the coffee world. I first heard about Irving Farm then, I really loved their coffee and all the people I met from the company. About the time we started working on the second shop I realized it was time to make a change and improve our house coffee and espresso as well. I reached out to Irving Farm and we’ve been using them as our primary roaster since the beginning of this year. They are really great people and really easy to work with—Teresa especially is rad. The quality is solidly reliable. And they are so knowledgeable and personable; the support on everything from technical equipment maintenance to better coffee preparation has been incredible. I had the opportunity to take staff up to the roastery and it was a really nice opportunity to introduce them to one more step in the process. I feel like they’re a real partner, not just another vendor looking to pick up a check.

Daily PressSo what are you working on now? As a business owner I’m never satisfied. If you’re not trying to continuously improve upon something, you’re dead. What i really gravitate to is building things and then maintaining/improving upon them. While coffee is central to my business, I spend most of my time reconfiguring things to make the space more inviting, easier for staff and customers to use. I can hang out in the basement of the hardware store with the guys that work there for hours, learning about different building materials and techniques. I’ve learned how to fix (almost) everything in the shop by tinkering around with it and asking a lot of questions. This whole process of opening and running a cafe, now two cafes, keeps me continually humbled. I’m in awe that anyone ever gets anything done. From coffee to small business, there’s so many pieces to the puzzle.   Thanks for your time, Michael, and for representing us so well in Brooklyn! Visit The Daily Press Bed-Stuy at 505 Franklin Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11238 or in South Williamsburg at 181 Havemeyer Street, Brooklyn, NY 11211.

Chilling With The Pantry in Cold Spring, NY

Coffee Pantry - Cold Spring NY

Coffee, to us, is about exposure. Exposure to a broad variety of cultures, flavors, people and ways of working. Our friends upstate at The Pantry in Cold Spring are right on our level: they, too, embrace the spirit of variety and community all wrapped up in the delicious flavors of every kind of beverage. We sat down with The Pantry's Samantha Lutzer to talk about coffee, indoor cycling, popping up and what it's like to brew in the Hudson Valley.

Tell us about the Pantry. What were you hoping to bring to the Cold Spring community? The mid-Hudson Valley is home to many former NYC dwellers who are part of the great northern migration to the Hudson Valley. They have very demanding and discerning palates, and I knew they would appreciate handcrafted artisanal coffee. Unlike my first shop in Brooklyn, which was single roaster-oriented, I wanted to bring a library of some of my favorite roasters that I enjoyed when I lived in the city. Right now, we have eight roasters but we'll have three new ones soon. We also have a craft beer library with over 100 types of craft beer. You can fill up our growlers with iced coffee concentrate or beer. 

Coffee Pantry

When did you first get interested in coffee?

Sadly, when I had my first Frappuccino in the mid-'90s. My friends in college called me the "classic reheat" because I always had a cup of coffee in my hand. I knew I loved artisanal coffee only within the last ten years, and I decided to get more serious about it when Ost Cafe opened on my corner in the East Village. And I took training classes at Intelligentsia's training lab in SoHo.

How did a cycling studio fit into your business plan?

The Pantry is essentially the cafe adjacent to our cross-training and spinning facility. In the city, my gym was by my office. I never had the luxury of enjoying my favorite coffee shops and the gym in the same day without a lengthy commute. Total bummer. So now I can spin, get a fresh pressed juice, and then make myself an amazing cup of coffee. #livingthedream

Tell us about the other cool spot where the Pantry is popping up.

The Pantry is co-sponsoring Bazaar-on-Hudson with the Living Room, an events space on Main Street, to bring a Brooklyn Flea-style event to the mid-Hudson Valley. It features largely Hudson Valley makers, but we have some courageous NYC artisans who come up for it. We do a multi-roaster, pop-up pour over bar, and we sell our iced coffee concentrate growlers. We did a similar program for the local farmers market in the winter, exclusively with our dear friends at Irving Farm.

Irving Farm Cold Brew

Growlers of iced Irving Farm coffee concentrate for sale by The Pantry at Bazaar on Hudson, via Instagram.

 Do you really handcraft each individual cup of coffee?

At the space in Brooklyn, we handcrafted French Press, but it was challenging at times with consistency and flow. Plus, you would have a super beautiful coffee, but you can't get a lot of range on a French Press, no matter if you do a three or four-minute brew, agitate or not agitate, clean the crema, etc. When I was opening The Pantry, I wanted to stay true to my purist ideals and only do handcrafted coffee, but I wanted to experience the coffee more. Teresa at Irving Farm understood my commitment and worked with me to find the right pour over method for our needs. We do every single cup of coffee as a pour over using flat bottom drippers, including iced coffee. I actually can't even drink French Press or iced coffee from a Toddy enjoyably. It all tastes the same, which is a shame for how unique the coffees are.

What Irving Farm coffee are you currently most excited about?

Our community generally prefers pretty comfortable flavor profiles as pour overs, so what I am excited about is not always the same as what they are excited about. We generally get less requests for fruit-forward, brighter coffees, so we sneak them in as iced coffee or on the espresso bar so we can prove the naysayers wrong. We have had a lot of different Irving Farm coffees in all year. The chocolaty, round ones are an easy sell, but I really loved the oaky Rwanda when we had it (it destroyed as an iced pour-over), and we are currently finishing up Amaro Gayo from Ethiopia.

Anything else you want to add?

Yes, I'd love for the owners of Anthropologie to come see The Pantry. It's my dream to have one of my stores in every one of their major urban locations.

Thank you, Samantha! See you at the Bazaar on Hudson or at your beautiful cafe very soon!

In the Kitchen: Karys Logue, Pastry Chef, Tessa NYC

In our recurring series In the Kitchen, we sit down with the restaurateurs and culinary pros who've partnered with Irving Farm to find out more about their inspirations—and of course, their feelings about coffee. In this installment, our newest Irving Farmer Josh Littlefield—pastry-lover, ice-cream connoisseur, and coffee expert, speaks with Karys Logue, Pastry Chef at Tessa, one of the most exciting new additions to the Upper West Side fine dining landscape. Here's what Josh found out about the story behind Tessa's inspired dessert program, and Logue own path to pastry.

Chef Logue almost led a very different life. In high school, she was drawn to the hard sciences, and had been accepted to Brown University's neuroscience program. But in the months leading to graduation, she noticed she was finding more enjoyment baking for the study groups she had organized, rather than actually studying her soon-to-be major.

She decided to forgo her Ivy League track to follow her culinary passion, and the rest is history. Shortly after graduating from the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, NY, she visited New York City one Friday for what she thought would be just a day-long trial at the restaurant Daniel. After her shift, the pastry chef approached her with an offer.  She would be granted a full-time position on the condition that she began the following Monday. Karys packed her bags, and within two days transplanted into a three-year career at Daniel, working alongside the critically acclaimed Dominique Ansel, creator of the infamous Cronut (of which I am personally guilty of waiting 2 hours in the rain for on one occasion. No regrets). After Daniel, Logue spent time in Australia as the pastry chef for Sepia, consistently regarded as Australia's finest restaurant, winning Restaurant of The Year in 2014. It was here she learned many of the modernist plating ideas and techniques that she employs today. After returning, she held the position of sous-chef and interim head pastry chef of Cafe Boulud. Recently, Karys took command as pastry chef of Tessa, developing the menu and overseeing its opening.

Karys

What field of pastry are you most passionate about?

For most of my recent memory it has been plated desserts. The opportunity to create an experience in an à la minute way, then seeing the excitement on a customer's face as it makes it to the table is so rewarding. It makes it pretty personal and I love it.

How did you develop the menu here at Tessa?

Seasonality, approachability, and surprise. I started by following some classical parameters—a light, fruit based dish; a chocolate-centered dessert; and then something in between. After that, seasonality is extremely important to me. Take for example the Spring Apricot Pastiche dish. I started with something as classical as a caramelized puff pastry. We then created an herbes de provence cream to tie it to the restaurant’s French and European influences. I then added the element of surprise—taking a German Halbtrocken Riesling, we created a concentrated poaching liquid to confit fresh apricots. This, paired with a micro-basil garnish gives an explosive, refreshing experience of acidity and brightness.

Tell us about the process of creating the Irving Farm Pot de Creme—you use both the 71 Irving House Blend and our signature espresso, Blackstrap?

In the menu I wanted to have items that all customers found familiar but then add a surprising twist. For the pot de creme, you would assume it’s just coffee plus chocolate.  Starting with that familiar combination that most everyone knows I let the ingredients such as your coffee speak for themselves then add components to further express. Candied orange zest was added to bring out the coffee’s brighter notes. The darker chocolate in the cake highlights the coffee’s richness. Then, you have the heartiness from the dates complimenting the full body of the espresso, and finally floral aspects and spices from the espresso are brought out through the cardamom.

Thanks so much for your time, Karys!

Tessa is located at 349 Amsterdam Ave, New York, New York, 10024. They're open seven days a week for lunch and dinner with a brunch menu so delicious on weekends, it's very likely that you may run into Josh or another member of Irving Farm enjoying their breakfast offerings—with a pot de creme chaser, of course.