AS THEFLIES


True Magic at Krupa Grocery

Irving Farm has a longstanding appreciation for great food—particularly breakfast-oriented foods. Our relationship with Brooklyn's Krupa Grocery, a restaurant that excels at breakfast-oriented foods as well as all foods from all the other times of day, has been going strong since their opening in April, 2014. 

Alchemy isn’t just about turning matter into gold. At least for Bob Lenartz, co-owner of Krupa Grocery in Windsor Terrace, it’s when things come together to create something greater than the sum of its parts. It’s magical. Bob had opened Slope Cellars and Windsor Wines, focusing on artisanal wines and spirits, and dreamed of building the kind of neighborhood place where folks could come to celebrate both the everyday and a special occasion. When the old Krupa Grocery on Prospect Park West became available, he saw an opportunity to make his bistro dream a reality. Krupa was a corner store and deli for over 20 years, owned and operated by the Patel family, that also happened to feature a backyard (a form of real estate alchemy in NYC). Locals called it “Love’s” because that was the salutation of endearment that greeted everyone who walked through the door. 

Barista Rex bringing the Irving Farm Coffee to the people at Krupa Grocery.[/caption] Around this time Bob made the acquaintance of Tom Sperduto, another Windsor Terrace resident with dreams of opening a neighborhood oasis. Once an elementary school art teacher who worked summers and weekends at Eleven Madison Park, he eventually moved into food full-time, developing his relationship to “enlightened hospitality” at Clinton Street Baking Company, Community Food & Juice, and Craftbar. The third piece of the puzzle was Tom’s colleague at Craftbar, Chef Domenick Gianfrancesco, who was ready for a kitchen of his own. Together, they spent over a year building out the former grocery space, salvaging original details such as the tin ceiling which they repurposed as a bar front. It was important for them to build upon the goodwill of the Patel family business (thus keeping the name) and allow the restaurant to reflect their love of food as well as community. 

One of Tom’s chief areas of interest happened to be coffee, as he had spent years developing the coffee programs at his other restaurants. He knew that great coffee was a necessary tool for integrating a new restaurant into neighborhood ritual, whether it’s starting the day with breakfast or the finish to a memorable meal, so he put great care into selecting special coffees and overseeing drink preparation. Now, after all the hard work and alignment of stars, you can go to Krupa for an expertly prepared cappuccino, breakfast gnocchi with bacon and beet greens, or a hanger steak garnished with bone marrow, and it all tastes like it was prepared just for you, like the food is saying, “Hey Love.” On a recent visit, Bob was standing near the bar explaining the history behind the hanging cymbal light fixtures, how each one came together piece by piece, slowly making something much more special than he originally thought he was building. Staring up at the cymbals, he realized that’s it. That’s alchemy. That’s Krupa. 

Krupa Grocery is located at 231 Prospect Park West, Brooklyn, NY 11215. They open for coffee at 7am seven days a week.

Book Nook With Teresa von Fuchs

Irving Farm

When Irving Farm's Director of Wholesale, Teresa von Fuchs, told us that she wanted to write a piece for the blog inspired by a French book from the '70s, we said, "Bring it!" Teresa is a mold breaker and a big inspiration for many people in the coffee industry. Here she reflects on literary theory, wine geekiness and, of course, her love of coffee.

I have always been a voracious reader. My mother joked that she often chided me to put the book down and go play outside. In college, I was a writing and literature major. I dove deep into pulling apart reading, looking in between the words, thinking about context and authorial bias, about otherness and narrative point of view. New ideas bubbled up everywhere. Toward the end of my last Literary Theory class, we were assigned The Pleasure of the Text by Roland Barthes. While it is about what the title might imply, it became more important for me as I grew and my span of reading grew. Initially, the book reminded me that part of what had drawn me to reading in the first place was the joy. Some of that joy had been lost in my learning to analyze reading and writing. I was happily reminded of The Pleasure of the Text's ideas when Irving Farm’s green coffee buyer, Dan Streetman, insisted I read Eric Asimov’s How to Love Wine. While Streetman is a much bigger wine geek than I am, he said what moved him most about the book was that it encapsulated how he feels about coffee: It’s delicious. Appreciate it. Share it with others. Repeat. What’s refreshing and so exciting about Asimov’s book is not that he’s so knowledgeable or has so many years and such breadth of experience with wine, which he does. It’s that he’s most interested in sharing his joy in wine with you, his reader. Part of my role at Irving Farm and as a coffee professional in general is to dissect what I’m tasting in the cup and why it tastes that way. That goes for crazy delicious tastes as well as off-putting flavors. What both Barthes’ and Asimov’s books reminded me is that though my role is to take coffee seriously, there’s still plenty of room to enjoy it. I can use my knowledge to take pleasure in each cup and to not forget to share my love along with my knowledge. One of the things that moves me most about coffee is thinking about all the people that had a hand in its existence before it ever gets to mine. Taking a moment each day to immerse myself in that wonder, or better yet, share that wonder with others, only adds to the pleasure in the cup. And pleasure need not be divorced from seriousness. It should enhance it.

Slowing Down and Cooling Down With Slow Food NYC

Irving Farm

We who love coffee know that without food, there would be no coffee, because we all would have starved to death. Sustainable food, then, goes hand in hand with sustainable coffee, and it was with excited hearts that we welcomed our friends at Slow Food NYC to our Flatiron training lab last Monday for a hot summer night that was all about staying cool. 

Irving

We led a class of 14 Slow Foodies on a guided adventure of cold brewing, icy pouring-over, and of course...cool coffee cocktails, all based on our summery sweet Amaro Gayo coffee from Ethiopia. 

This was our first time teaming up with Slow Food NYC...and definitely not our last. We're looking forward to more collabos and classes in the future, and we'll be sure to let you know.

In the meantime, here's a peek at our night with Teresa, Josh and Angelika schoolin' Slow Food on cool coffee. Iced Pour-Over (Japanese-style) Cold Brew (24 hours) Affogato (espresso over fresh ice cream) Amaro Gayo Egg Cream (espresso, chocolate & vanilla syrups shaken and topped with soda water) Purple Reign (Amaro Gayo, Aperol orange bitters, dry vermouth, grapefruit. Served neat or over ice.) Espresso & Clouds (espresso over citrus simple syrup foam)

We had a blast cooling off these true food enthusiasts, and can't wait to start warming up for the next class soon!

In the Kitchen: Karys Logue, Pastry Chef, Tessa NYC

In our recurring series In the Kitchen, we sit down with the restaurateurs and culinary pros who've partnered with Irving Farm to find out more about their inspirations—and of course, their feelings about coffee. In this installment, our newest Irving Farmer Josh Littlefield—pastry-lover, ice-cream connoisseur, and coffee expert, speaks with Karys Logue, Pastry Chef at Tessa, one of the most exciting new additions to the Upper West Side fine dining landscape. Here's what Josh found out about the story behind Tessa's inspired dessert program, and Logue own path to pastry.

Chef Logue almost led a very different life. In high school, she was drawn to the hard sciences, and had been accepted to Brown University's neuroscience program. But in the months leading to graduation, she noticed she was finding more enjoyment baking for the study groups she had organized, rather than actually studying her soon-to-be major.

She decided to forgo her Ivy League track to follow her culinary passion, and the rest is history. Shortly after graduating from the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, NY, she visited New York City one Friday for what she thought would be just a day-long trial at the restaurant Daniel. After her shift, the pastry chef approached her with an offer.  She would be granted a full-time position on the condition that she began the following Monday. Karys packed her bags, and within two days transplanted into a three-year career at Daniel, working alongside the critically acclaimed Dominique Ansel, creator of the infamous Cronut (of which I am personally guilty of waiting 2 hours in the rain for on one occasion. No regrets). After Daniel, Logue spent time in Australia as the pastry chef for Sepia, consistently regarded as Australia's finest restaurant, winning Restaurant of The Year in 2014. It was here she learned many of the modernist plating ideas and techniques that she employs today. After returning, she held the position of sous-chef and interim head pastry chef of Cafe Boulud. Recently, Karys took command as pastry chef of Tessa, developing the menu and overseeing its opening.

Karys

What field of pastry are you most passionate about?

For most of my recent memory it has been plated desserts. The opportunity to create an experience in an à la minute way, then seeing the excitement on a customer's face as it makes it to the table is so rewarding. It makes it pretty personal and I love it.

How did you develop the menu here at Tessa?

Seasonality, approachability, and surprise. I started by following some classical parameters—a light, fruit based dish; a chocolate-centered dessert; and then something in between. After that, seasonality is extremely important to me. Take for example the Spring Apricot Pastiche dish. I started with something as classical as a caramelized puff pastry. We then created an herbes de provence cream to tie it to the restaurant’s French and European influences. I then added the element of surprise—taking a German Halbtrocken Riesling, we created a concentrated poaching liquid to confit fresh apricots. This, paired with a micro-basil garnish gives an explosive, refreshing experience of acidity and brightness.

Tell us about the process of creating the Irving Farm Pot de Creme—you use both the 71 Irving House Blend and our signature espresso, Blackstrap?

In the menu I wanted to have items that all customers found familiar but then add a surprising twist. For the pot de creme, you would assume it’s just coffee plus chocolate.  Starting with that familiar combination that most everyone knows I let the ingredients such as your coffee speak for themselves then add components to further express. Candied orange zest was added to bring out the coffee’s brighter notes. The darker chocolate in the cake highlights the coffee’s richness. Then, you have the heartiness from the dates complimenting the full body of the espresso, and finally floral aspects and spices from the espresso are brought out through the cardamom.

Thanks so much for your time, Karys!

Tessa is located at 349 Amsterdam Ave, New York, New York, 10024. They're open seven days a week for lunch and dinner with a brunch menu so delicious on weekends, it's very likely that you may run into Josh or another member of Irving Farm enjoying their breakfast offerings—with a pot de creme chaser, of course.

Pastry Chef Laurie Jon Moran on Coffee as a Dessert Ingredient

In this third in a series of interviews by Irving Farm to the talented food and drink professionals we work in partnership with, we take a minute with Executive Pastry Chef Laurie Jon Moran of Le Bernardin.


How did you get started in the food and beverage industry? and What's your role now?
I knew I wanted to be a chef when I was about 14 years old, so after high school I went to culinary school rather than college. Now I’m lucky enough to be the Executive Pastry Chef at Le Bernardin.

What led you to pastry in your career?
While I was in culinary school I enjoyed pastry more and was more attracted to it because of the precision and technicality.

Tell us more about how you use coffee in creating your dessert menu? How do the individual flavor profiles of each coffee affect how you approach them?
The approach is generally to get as much of the natural flavor profile of the coffee beans into the dessert as we can, especially the lighter more floral notes that often get lost in dessert preparations.

What's the most successful dessert you've ever made incorporating coffee?
The coffee dessert that we have on the menu right now is quite popular. It’s a play on a tiramisu but with coffee being the main flavor, supported by mascarpone and salted caramel. We try to make the quality and flavor of the coffee beans the thing that makes the dessert special and infuse them into most of the components.

What coffee/s are you currently working with? What interests or excites you about them?
We are currently using beans from Los Lirios, Honduras in our coffee dessert. I love its balance and fruity acidity. It is also one of my favourite coffees as an espresso, although for me, nothing has beaten the Amaro Gayo beans from Ethiopia.

What's been the most interesting thing you've learned about coffee?
I didn’t realize how unique different coffees can be and how big the range of flavor profiles is. Trying different coffees as the selections changed at the Irving Farm 79th street shop really opened my eyes to that, then doing a cupping at the training lab really blew me away.